Myotcstore.com Blog | Health topics on OTC medicines, Nutrition products and Beauty tips.
Myotcstore.com Blog | Health topics on OTC medicines, Nutrition products and Beauty tips.
blog.myotcstore.com
Shop By Brands @ myotcstore |

Age Related Eye Dieases

Age Related Eye Dieases

Aged Related Macular Degeneration
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an eye condition that affects a tiny part of the retina at the back of your eye, which is called the macula. The macula is made up of millions of light-sensing cells that provide sharp, detailed central vision. The macula is a small area in the retina  the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. The macula is the part of the retina that is responsible for your central vision, allowing you to see fine details clearly. The retina quickly turns light into electrical signals and then sends these electrical signals to the brain through the optic nerve. Next, the brain translates the electrical signals into images we see. If the macula is damaged, fine points in these images are not clear.
Age Related Eye Dieases

Types of Macular Degeneration
Dry, or atrophic, Macular Degeneration: Dry AMD is the most common form of AMD in its early or intermediate stages. It occurs in about 90 percent of the people with the condition. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down, gradually blurring central vision in the affected eye. As dry AMD progresses, you may see a blurred spot in the center of your vision. Eye care professional may call this "geographic atrophy." Over time, central vision in the affected eye can be slowly lost as less of the macula works.

Wet, or exudative, Macular Degeneration: Wet AMD affects about 10 percent of all people with AMD. This type, however, is more severe than the early and intermediate stages of the dry form. Wet AMD happens when abnormal blood vessels behind the retina start to grow under the macula. These new blood vessels can be fragile and leak blood and fluid. The blood and fluid cause the macula to swell and damage occurs rapidly. The damage may also cause scarring of the retina. 
Aged Related Macular Degeneration

Adding certain nutrients to your diet every day - either through foods or supplements - can help save your vision. Researchers have linked eye-friendly nutrients such as lutein/zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc to reducing the risk of certain eye diseases, including macular degeneration.

1. Lutein and Zeaxanthin - 10 mg Lutein, 2 mg Zeaxanthin per day to slow AMD progression
2. Vitamin C - Need 500 mg per day to slow AMD progression
3. Vitamin E - Need 400 mg per day to slow AMD progression
4. Zinc - Need 40 to 80 mg daily to slow AMD progression

Blepharitis
Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids causing red, irritated, itchy eyelids and the formation of dandruff-like scales on eyelashes. It is a common eye disorder caused by either bacterial or a skin condition such as dandruff of the scalp or acne rosacea. It affects people of all ages. Although uncomfortable, blepharitis is not contagious and generally does not cause any permanent damage to eyesight.
Blepharitis
Blepharitis has two basic forms:
• Anterior blepharitis occurs at the outside front edge of the eyelid where the eyelashes are attached.
• Posterior blepharitis affects the inner edge of the eyelid that comes in contact with the eyeball.

It's common to have a mixture of both anterior and posterior forms of blepharitis at the same time, but in different degrees of severity.

In some cases of posterior blepharitis, eye doctors recommend nutritional supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids, such as flaxseed oil, to aid healthy function of meibomian glands that provide essential lubrication for eye and eyelid comfort.

Cataracts
A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision.  It is the most common cause of blindness and is conventionally treated with surgery. Visual loss occurs because opacification of the lens obstructs light from passing and being focused on to the retina at the back of the eye. Most cataracts are related to aging. Cataracts are very common in older people. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery.
Cataracts

A cataract can occur in either or both eyes. It cannot spread from one eye to the other.
1. Secondary cataract. Cataracts can form after surgery for other eye problems, such as glaucoma. Cataracts also can develop in people who have other health problems, such as diabetes. Cataracts are sometimes linked to steroid use.

2. Traumatic cataract. Cataracts can develop after an eye injury, sometimes years later.

3. Congenital cataract. Some babies are born with cataracts or develop them in childhood, often in both eyes. These cataracts may be so small that they do not affect vision. If they do, the lenses may need to be removed.

4. Radiation cataract. Cataracts can develop after exposure to some types of radiation.

Though there is significant controversy about whether cataracts can be prevented, a number of studies suggest certain nutrients and nutritional supplements may reduce your risk of cataracts. One large, 10-year study of female health professionals found that higher dietary intakes of vitamin E and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin from food and supplements were associated with significantly decreased risks of cataract.

Good food sources of vitamin E include sunflower seeds, almonds and spinach. Good sources of lutein and zeaxanthin include spinach, kale and other green, leafy vegetables. Other studies have shown antioxidant vitamins such as vitamin C and foods containing omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cataract risk.

Cornea and Corneal Disease
The cornea is the clear, protective outer layer of the eye. Along with the sclera (white of the eye), it serves as a barrier against dirt, germs, and other particles that can harm the eye's delicate components. The cornea is also capable of filtering out some amounts of the sun's ultraviolet light.
Cornea and Corneal Disease

The cornea also plays a key role in vision. As light enters the eye, it is refracted, or bent, by the outside shape of the cornea. The curvature of this outer layer helps determine how well your eye can focus on objects close-up and far away.

There are three main layers of the cornea:
1. Epithelium: The most superficial layer of the cornea, the epithelium stops outside matter from entering the eye. This layer of the cornea also absorbs oxygen and nutrients from tears.

2. Stroma: The stroma is the largest layer of the cornea and is found behind the epithelium. It is made up mostly of water and proteins that give it an elastic but solid form.

3. Endothelium: The endothelium is a single layer of cells located between the stroma and the aqueous humor - the clear fluid found in the front and rear chambers of the eye. The endothelium works as a pump, expelling excess water as it is absorbed into the stroma. Without this specialized function, the stroma could become water logged, hazy and opaque in appearance, also reducing vision.

Diabetic retinopathy, the most common diabetic eye disease, occurs when blood vessels in the retina change. Sometimes these vessels swell and leak fluid or even close off completely. In other cases, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina.

Dry Eye
Dry eye is a condition in which there are insufficient tears to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. People with dry eyes either do not produce enough tears or have a poor quality of tears. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.

Dry Eye
Dry eyes can result from an improper balance of tear production and drainage.
1. Inadequate amount of tears – Tears are produced by several glands in and around the eyelids. Tear production tends to diminish with age, with various medical conditions, or as a side effect of certain medicines. Environmental conditions such as wind and dry climates can also affect tear volume by increasing tear evaporation. When the normal amount of tear production decreases or tears evaporate too quickly from the eyes, symptoms of dry eye can develop.

2. Layers of tears Poor quality of tears – Tears are made up of three layers: oil, water, and mucus. Each component serves a function in protecting and nourishing the front surface of the eye. A smooth oil layer helps to prevent evaporation of the water layer, while the mucin layer functions in spreading the tears evenly over the surface of the eye. If the tears evaporate too quickly or do not spread evenly over the cornea due to deficiencies with any of the three tear layers, dry eye symptoms can develop.

Eye Floaters
Eye floaters are those tiny spots, specks, flecks and "cobwebs" that drift aimlessly around in your field of vision. While annoying, ordinary eye floaters and spots are very common and usually aren't cause for alarm. Floaters and spots typically appear when tiny pieces of the eye's gel-like vitreous break loose within the inner back portion of the eye.

Eye Floaters Supplement aims to help you by providing a unique and powerful mixture of vitamins, nutrients and antioxidants. The Complete supplement includes larger nutrient doses and an added multivitamin mix to ensure your eyes get what they need to work their best. Eat more animal liver, eggs, beans, meat, fresh vegetables, fruit, seafood and fish, less spicy food and drink less coffee in your daily life you can get these nutrient composition

Key Ingredients:
250 mg L-Methionine: This antioxidant promotes the breakdown of fats, and helps with potentially harmful free radicals. Our Complete supplement includes a larger dose of this important antioxidant.

20100 mcg Lutein: An important nutrient that's rare in food, except in the case of green leafy vegetables. An even larger dose such as this can promote eye health for years to come.

5500 IU Vitamin A: An essential vitamin for night vision and general eye health.

Multivitamin Mix: Your eyes are a nutrient-hungry organ – they need more vitamins and minerals than most people get in their diets. The Complete supplement provides an added multivitamin mix to nourish your eyes through and through.

Hyperopia
Hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, is a common type of refractive error where distant objects may be seen more clearly than objects that are near. However, people experience hyperopia differently. Some people may not notice any problems with their vision, especially when they are young. For people with significant hyperopia, vision can be blurry for objects at any distance, near or far. 
Hyperopia

Hyperopia Symptoms and Signs
Farsighted people sometimes have headaches or eye strain and may squint or feel fatigued when performing work at close range. If you get these symptoms while wearing your eyeglasses or contact lenses, you may need an eye exam and a new prescription.
Macular Hole
A macular hole is a small break in the macula, located in the center of the eye's light-sensitive tissue called the retina. The macula provides the sharp, central vision we need for reading, driving, and seeing fine detail.  A macular hole can cause blurred and distorted central vision. Macular holes are related to aging and usually occur in people over age 60. This can be a significant problem because a healthy macula is needed to see the fine detail required for reading and driving. A macular hole is not related to macular degeneration; these are two different problems.

Macular Hole


Symptoms
Visual problems from a macular hole usually occur gradually. The first symptoms are often blurry and distorted central vision. Straight lines might look wavy, distorted or have missing segments. There may be a gray area or blind spot in the central vision. Sometimes a patient does not notice a problem for some time because they do not cover their good eye and realize that they have a problem looking with the eye containing the macular hole. Reading often becomes difficult. 

Macular Pucker
A macular pucker (also called an epiretinal membrane) is a layer of scar tissue that grows on the surface of the retina, particularly the macula, which is the part of your eye responsible for detailed, central vision. Macular pucker is also known as epiretinal membrane, preretinal membrane, cellophane maculopathy, retina wrinkle, surface wrinkling retinopathy, premacular fibrosis, and internal limiting membrane disease. 
 Macular Pucker

Symptoms
Vision loss from a macular pucker can vary from no loss to severe loss, although severe vision loss is uncommon. People with a macular pucker may notice that their vision is blurry or mildly distorted, and straight lines can appear wavy. They may have difficulty in seeing fine detail and reading small print. There may be a gray area in the center of your vision, or perhaps even a blind spot.

Myopia (Nearsightedness)
Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, is a common type of refractive error where close objects appear clearly, but distant objects appear blurry.  Nearsightedness occurs if the eyeball is too long or the cornea, the clear front cover of the eye, has too much curvature. As a result, the light entering the eye isn’t focused correctly and distant objects look blurred.
Myopia (Nearsightedness)

Myopia Symptoms and Signs
If you are nearsighted, you typically will have difficulty reading road signs and seeing distant objects clearly, but will be able to see well for close-up tasks such as reading and computer use. Other signs and symptoms of myopia include squinting, eye strain and headaches. Feeling fatigued when driving or playing sports also can be a symptom of uncorrected nearsightedness.

Myopia can be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgery.
Eyeglasses are the simplest and safest way to correct myopia. Your eye care professional can prescribe lenses that will correct the problem and help you to see your best.

Contact Lenses work by becoming the first refractive surface for light rays entering the eye, causing a more precise refraction or focus. In many cases, contact lenses provide clearer vision, a wider field of vision, and greater comfort. They are a safe and effective option if fitted and used properly. However, contact lenses are not right for everyone. Discuss this with your eye care professional.

Nutrition Supplements for myopia treatment: Almost all the antioxidants likely have a positive influence on eye health. Of particular importance are vitamins C, E, selenium, and the carotenoids found in fruits and vegetables. Two particular carotenoids, called lutein and zeaxanthin, play an important role in protecting eye tissue in the macula from damage by free radicals, and perhaps partially help prevent myopia or reduce myopia severity progression. Corn, eggs, green leafy vegetables, peppers, red grapes and pumpkins are some of the foods rich in lutein and zeazanthin. You can also find carotenoids and flavonoids in many herbs, including milk thistle and bilberry. Interestingly, bilberry contains anthocyanosides that could be beneficial in myopia. Fish oil supplements are helpful since the retina needs the important fatty acid DHA for optimal visual acuity.
Uveitis
Uveitis is swelling and irritation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye. The uvea provides most of the blood supply to the retina. It is a condition that occurs in the uvea, or the middle coat of the eye. Because the uvea contains the blood vessels that supply nutrients to the eye, any form of uveitis may be a serious eye disorder and may be a symptom for other serious conditions. Uveitis is a leading cause of blindness affecting individuals of all ages, genders, and races. 
Uveitis

Symptoms may develop rapidly and can include:
• Blurred vision
• Dark, floating spots in the vision
• Eye pain
• Redness of the eye
• Sensitivity to light

Several different types of steroid medication may be used, depending on the type of uveitis you have. Eye drops are often used for uveitis affecting the front of the eye, whereas injections, tablets and capsules are more often used to treat uveitis affecting the middle and back of the eye.

1 comment:

  1. An eye loses its vision with every growing age group. In which Myopia is one of a kind. Nearsightedness, or myopia, as it is medically termed, is a vision condition in which close objects are seen clearly, but objects farther away appear blurred. Nearsightedness occurs if the eyeball is too long or the cornea, the clear front cover of the eye, has too much curvature. As a result, the light entering the eye isn’t focused correctly and distant objects look blurred. Here Myopia Treatment In San Diego is done by Dr. Tracy a Board Certified Surgeon who specializes in LASIK and PRK eye surgery. Consult with the surgeon if your dealing with myopia. Thanks

    ReplyDelete