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Tooth Cavity Protection

Tooth Cavity Protection

Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface of your teeth that develop into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination of factors, including bacteria in your mouth, not cleaning your teeth well, frequent snacking and sipping sugary drinks

Cavities, also known as tooth decay, occur when plague, the sticky substance that forms on teeth, combines with the sugars and / or starches of the foods that we eat. This combination produces acids that attack tooth enamel.

Tooth decay is also the second most prevalent disease in the United States (the common cold is first). Fortunately, cavities can be easily prevented.
1. Brush Your Teeth
: In the fight against cavities, it is essential that you brush your teeth properly at least twice a day with a toothpaste containing fluoride.

2. Floss Daily: Food debris gets caught in between our teeth when we eat. If the debris is not removed, it can lead to cavities. Flossing everyday is the best way to remove food debris from in between the teeth.

3. Eat Healthy: Proper nutrition plays an important role in good dental health. Eating nutritional snacks and limiting the amount of sugary drinks will help to prevent plaque from forming on the teeth.

4. Visit Your Dentist: Many cavities can only be detected by a dentist or a dental X-ray. Visiting your dentist for regular check ups and cleanings are a key factor in preventing cavities and staying on top of good oral hygiene.

5. Have Sealants Placed: Dental sealants are a protective coating that is applied to the biting surfaces of the back teeth. The sealant protects the tooth from getting a cavity by shielding against bacteria and plaque. Sealants are more common in children because of the new growth of permanent teeth, however, sealants can benefit adults to.

6. Use a Mouthrinse: There are several antimicrobial mouth rinses on the market that have been clinically proven to reduce plaque, such as Listerine or Crest Pro Health. Rinsing with one of these mouth rinses after brushing or eating can aid in cavity prevention.

7. Chew (Sugarless) Gum: Relieve it or not, chewing certain sugarless gums can actually help to prevent cavities by increasing the flow of saliva in your mouth. In 2007, the American Dental Association awarded their Seal of Acceptance to Wrigley's Orbit, Eclipse and Extra chewing gums for helping to prevent cavities.

Dental cavities are holes in teeth caused by tooth decay. Dental cavities are permanently damaged areas that often develop into holes in the enamel, or hard outer surface, of your teeth. Cavities are also known as tooth decay or caries. Anyone with teeth can get a cavity, but they are most common in small children and young adults. There are three types of cavity:
• Smooth surface cavities, which appear on the sides of your teeth
• Pit and fissure cavities, which appear on the bumpy surface on the top of your tooth that is used for chewing
• Root cavities, which appear over the roots of your teeth, below the gum-line

How does a cavity form?
Two main factors contribute to tooth decay bacteria and a diet high in sugar and starch. There are over 500 different types of bacteria that are normally present in the mouth. These bacteria combine with food and saliva to form a sticky substance called plaque that attaches to teeth. Foods rich in starches add to the stickiness of the plaque, which begins to get hard if it remains on the teeth after a couple of days and turns into tartar or calculus. Bacteria in the plaque convert sugar into acid that dissolves the tooth structure causing holes, or cavities. Because of these two contributing factors, dental caries have been described as a “dietobacterial” disease.

Tooth Cavity Protection


The parts of teeth that are most vulnerable to tooth decay are areas where plaque can accumulate most easily. Plaque tends to settle into the pits and fissures in the tops of teeth, into the areas in between the teeth, and next to the gum line. Where there is plaque, there are bacteria and acid, and eventually destruction of the tooth surface. The cavity starts in the outer layer of the tooth (enamel) and as it gets deeper, penetrates into the softer inner layer of the tooth (dentin.) Typically, it isn't until the decay reaches the dentin that a person will start to notice signs and symptoms of the cavity.

How Will I Know if I Have a Cavity?
The symptoms of a dental cavity will depend on the type of cavity and the severity of decay. When a cavity first develops, it’s likely that you won’t even know it’s there.

When a cavity gets larger, you may experience:
•  Toothache
• Sensitivity to heat, cold, and sweets
• Pain when biting down
• Visible holes or black spots on teeth

Regular dental exams (about every six months) can help catch any problems early on. Finding a dental cavity before it starts causing you pain can help you avoid extensive damage and possible tooth loss. If you start feeling pain and aching in your mouth, see your dentist as soon as possible.

How Do Cavities Develop?
The cause of a cavity is tooth decay. The hard surface, or enamel, of your tooth can become damaged over time. Bacteria, food particles, and naturally occurring acids form a sticky film called plaque that coats your teeth. The acid in plaque eventually starts to eat away at your enamel. Once the acid eats through your enamel, dentin is next. Dentin is the second, softer layer of your teeth that is more easily damaged.

Tooth Cavity Protection

If your tooth decay continues without treatment, the pulp (inside) of your tooth may be affected. The pulp of your tooth houses blood vessels and nerves. When decay spreads to the pulp, it can cause nerve damage, resulting in pain, irritation, and swelling. In cases of advanced tooth decay, pus may form around the tooth as the immune system attempts to fight the decay–causing bacteria.

What Can I Do to Keep Cavities From Forming?
Taking good care of your teeth is the best way to prevent cavities. Great cavity prevention starts at home, but regular dental checkups are necessary as well. Follow these tips for good oral hygiene to prevent cavities:

• Use toothpaste that contains fluoride. Fluoride can stop and even reverse tooth decay, making it a powerful weapon in the fight against cavities.

• Brush your teeth at least twice per day, once in the morning and once before bed. If you can, brush your teeth after meals as well.

• Floss between your teeth daily to remove food particles and prevent plaque buildup.

• Avoid frequent snacking and limit the amount of sweet, sticky foods you eat. Snacking can create a near-constant supply of tooth decay-causing acid in your mouth, and sugary, carbonated foods and beverages can damage enamel. If you do snack, rinse your mouth with an unsweetened beverage afterward to help remove food particles and bacteria from your mouth.

Myotcstore Related Products:

Crest Gel, Cavity Protection Cool Mint - 6.4 Oz

Aim cavity protection toothpaste - 6 oz

Colgate cavity protection toothpaste great regular flavor - 8.2 oz

Aquafresh Fluoride Triple Protection Toothpaste, Cavity Protection - 6.4 Oz

Toms of Maine Cavity Protection Toothpaste, Spearmint - 5.5 oz

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